Human Services

Debunking the Myth of "Sanctuary Cities": Community Policing Policies Protect American Communities

Report Author: 
Lynn Tramont
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Apr

 

There is much confusion about the term "sanctuary city." The term is often used derisively by immigration opponents to blast what are best described as community policing policies. Critics claim that these cities and states provide "sanctuary" to undocumented immigrants, but research shows that the opposite is true.

Source Organization: 
Immigration Policy Center

Immigration Policy and Less-Skilled Workers in the United States: Reflections on Future Directions for Reform

Report Author: 
Harry J. Holzer
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Jan

While broad consensus exists regarding the benefits of highly skilled immigration, the economic role of low-skilled immigrants remains in dispute. In this assessment of the research literature, the author makes an economics-based case for significant reform of the US immigration system.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Communicating More for Less: Using Translation and Interpretation Technology to Serve Limited English Proficient Individuals

Report Author: 
Jessica Sperling
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Jan

Advances in translation and interpretation technology have given language access professionals a multitude of options for breaking down language barriers. However, with different and seemingly complex types of technologies now available, selecting the right technology system can be a challenge. And because language access needs vary immensely, rarely do agencies or service organizations have translation and interpretation needs that can be met the same way.

This report provides an overview of available technologies, discussing their purposes, costs and benefits.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

E-Verify: Strengths, Weaknesses and Proposals for Reform

Report Author: 
Marc R. Rosenblum
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Feb

With Congress likely to consider new mandates involving E-Verify, the currently voluntary employment eligibility verification system, this article examines the strengths and weaknesses of E-Verify, which has grown dramatically in recent years.

It also discusses proposals for reform, including adding biometric screening to the system.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Obstacles and Opportunities for Regional Cooperation: The US-Mexico Case

Report Author: 
Marc R. Rosenblum
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Apr

 

US-Mexico relations on migration, dating back to the 1890s, have gone through several distinct phases: from an era of laissez faire policies to the Bracero Program, from a more unilateral US policy approach to Mexico's "policy of no policy" stance, and to the current post-9/11 enforcement focus.

This report traces the evolution of bilateral migration relations and offers some lessons for the US-Mexico relationship going forward. The history suggests that cooperation, while difficult, is not impossible and can offer benefits for both countries.

 

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigrants in the United States: How Well Are they Integrating into Society?

Report Author: 
Tomas R. Jimenez
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 May

Sociologist Tomás Jiménez examines the integration of immigrants in the USA across five indicators: language proficiency, socioeconomic attainment, political participation, residential locale and social interaction with host communities. Jiménez finds the recent inflow of immigrants is integrating reasonably well—and learning English faster than ever before—almost entirely without the help of policy intervention.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigrant Workers in the Massachusetts Health Care Industry

Report Author: 
Ramon Borges-Mendez, James Jennings, Donna Haig Friedman, Malo Hutson, and Teresa Eliot Roberts
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Mar
Foreign-born and foreign-trained workers and professionals are increasingly a vital share of the labor force in health care and its allied sub-sectors. In 2000, 1.7 million foreign-born workers (immigrants) accounted for 11.7 percent of all health care workers in the U.S. This includes non-medical personnel and maintenance workers who do not necessarily deliver health services but whose work highly influences the quality of care. The share of foreign-born workers in direct health care service provision was higher: 13 percent.
Source Organization: 
Immigrant Learning Center
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