Demographics

Unaccompanied migrant children in the United States: Predictors of placement stability in long term foster care

Report Author: 
Crea, T. M., Lopez, A., Taylor, T., Underwood, D.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Beginning in 2011, there was an increase of unaccompanied children from the Central American Northern Triangle (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras,) entering the U.S. While many children were placed with adult sponsors, about 5%-35% remain in long term foster care (LTFC) waiting for deportation hearings. Research has shown that instability in the foster system such as moving frequently has led to poor outcomes.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Education and Work Profiles of the DACA Population

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

The authors of this report applied their unique methodology to Census data to determine the characteristics of what they call the DACA “immediately eligible” population—those who have met all educational requirements for participation in the program. Past studies of this population have been survey-based, but have not been fully representative.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

The Philippines: Beyond Labor Migration, Toward Development and (Possibly) Return

Report Author: 
Maruja M.B. Asis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

The Philippines has a significant culture of migration and is a major labor exporter worldwide. Ten million Filipinos, around 10 percent of the population, are working abroad, primarily in the Middle East and Asia. Thanks to an improved economy in recent years, the Philippines is now developing policies for returning overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). This study examines the evolving labor policies of the last few decades and shows how the country is incorporating migration into its long-term development planning.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

National Interests and Common Ground in the US Immigration Debate: How to Legalize the US Immigration System and Permanently Reduce Its Undocumented Population

Report Author: 
Donald Kerwin & Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The authors of this paper sketch out a path to reducing the undocumented population in the U.S. through fundamental reform of our immigration system. In their plan, they seem less concerned with "amnesty" programs and more with reforms that will ensure that the undocumented population does not grow again in the future. The paper begins with an analysis of presidential signing statements for immigration-related legislation going back to 1924. "These statements," according to the authors, "reveal broad consensus on the interests and values that the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States

Report Author: 
Ryan Schultheis and Ariel G. Ruiz Soto
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Return migration to the United States by deportees from Mexico has slowed down significantly in the past decade. The Migration Policy Institute report, A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States, gives a statistical and demographic profile of Mexican adults returned by the United States government between 2005 and 2015 using data collected by the Mexican Interior Ministry.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Is Border Enforcement Effective? What We Know and What It Means

Report Author: 
Edward Alden
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

For the first time, evidence is now available to settle the ongoing debate between the "enforcers," i.e. people who believe that strengthened border enforcement can significantly reduce illegal immigration, and their critics, who believe that economic opportunity would continue to drive illegal migration despite the billions of dollars spent on border security. According to the author of this essay, the enforcers have won the argument.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Zero Undocumented Population Growth Is Here to Stay and Immigration Reform Would Preserve and Extend These Gains

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This report shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the Great Recession had little, if any, role in reducing the growth of the undocumented population in the United States. Rather, the population stopped growing because of greater scrutiny of air travel after 9/11, additional resources dedicated to southern border enforcement since the mid-nineties, improved economic and demographic conditions in Mexico, and the ability of some undocumented immigrants (those who overstayed their temporary visas) to acquire legal status.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

The Aging Apple: Older Immigrants a Rising Share of New York's Seniors

Report Author: 
Christian González-Rivera
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This data brief updates an earlier (2013) report on New York's immigrant senior population. Immigrant seniors now represent an even larger share of the total senior population in the city, reaching almost 50 percent of the total (up from 46 percent in 2010).  The data brief reports trends in the senior population by nativity for the five boroughs, for particular neighborhoods, and for selected countries of origin.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Center for an Urban Future

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Haitian Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jennifer Schulz and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

In recent decades, the United States has experienced a significant increase in the number of immigrants from Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. While just 5,000 Haitians lived in the United States in 1960, migrants from Haiti began arriving in larger numbers following the collapse of the Jean-Claude Duvalier dictatorship in the late 1980s. Beyond political instability, endemic poverty and natural disasters, including a devastating 2010 earthquake, have propelled migration to the United States, often by boat.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute
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