Research

Immigrant Entrepreneurs in the Massachusetts Biotechnology Industry

Report Author: 
Daniel J. Monti, Laurel Smith-Doerr and James McQuaid
Original Date of Publication: 
2007 Jun

The findings suggest that the nationwide trend of skilled immigrants creating high tech businesses is also affecting the Massachusetts biotechnology industry.

Among the more striking conclusions found about biotechnology firms founded in New England are:
• In 25.7 percent of these companies, at least one founder was foreign-born.
• Biotechnology companies in New England with at least one immigrant founder produced over $7.6 billion in sales and employed over 4,000 workers in 2006.

Source Organization: 
Immigrant Learning Center

Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers: Demographic Characteristics and Economic Footprint

Report Author: 
Alan Clayton-Mathews, Paul Watanabe
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Jun

This report compares the foreign-born and native-born populations along the following dimensions: demographic characteristics, income, industry and occupation, contribution to state and local taxes and certain social costs.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Potential Economic Impacts in Oregon of Implementing Proposed Department of Homeland Security “No Match” Immigration Rules

Report Author: 
William Jaeger
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Jun

This study evaluates the impact of implementing a strict “No Match” immigration rule on
Oregon’s economy. The analysis assumes that such a policy would lead to the departure of
Oregon’s estimated 150,000 undocumented immigrants, of which 97,500 are estimated to be part of Oregon’s workforce. The main findings of the study are as follows:

1. In the immediate or short run, the loss of undocumented workers in Oregon which

Source Organization: 
Coalition for a Working Oregon

A Conversaton about the Economic Effects of Immigration on African Americans

Report Author: 
Gerald D. Jaynes
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Jul

A short "conversation" covering the main effects of immigration on African Americans. These are summary points without data presented, though with a couple of citations.

Source Organization: 
Immigration Policy Center

Immigration and the Wealth of States

Report Author: 
Richard Nadler
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Jan

An analysis of data from 50 states and the District of Columbia demonstrates that a high resident population and/or inflow of immigrants is associated with elevated levels and growth rates in Gross State Product, Personal Income, Per Capita Personal Income, Disposable Income, Per Capita Disposable Income, Median Household Income, and Median Per Capita Income.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Americas Majority Foundation

An Essential Resource: An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Undocumented Workers on Business Activity in the US with Estimated Effects by State and by Industry

Report Author: 
The Perryman Group Waco
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Apr

This study estimates that there are currently approximately 8.1 million undocumented workers in the US economy. If these workers were removed from the workforce, the effects would ripple through many industries and the ultimate job losses would be even higher. For the US as a whole, the immediate negative effect of eliminating the undocumented workforce would include an estimated

Source Organization: 
The Perryman Group

Financial Access for Immigrants: Lessons from Diverse Perspectives

Report Author: 
Center for the Study of Financial Access for Immigrants
Original Date of Publication: 
2006 May

Financial access — knowing what one's financial options are and having products and services to choose from — is closely linked to economic prosperity. The success of today's immigrants — who come to the United States largely seeking to improve their own prospects for prosperity — depends on their access to mainstream financial institutions that can help them save money, buy homes, access credit, start businesses and otherwise build wealth.

Source Organization: 
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Accounting for Regional Migration Patterns and Homeownership Disparities in the Hmong-American Refugee Community, 1980-2000

Report Author: 
Michael Grover
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Oct

Hmong refugees began arriving in significant numbers in the United States in the late 1970s. Compared to typical immigrants, Hmong-Americans came with few financial, labor market, or co-ethnic support factors in favor of their economic success in the United States.

Source Organization: 
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

A Portrait of New England's Immigrants

Report Author: 
Antoniya Owens
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Nov

New England is home to 1.6 million immigrants. Their number is growing far faster than that of the native population. They are more likely than natives to be of working age. Moreover, they are better educated than immigrants nationwide, with more than three quarters having a high school diploma, and close to a third holding a bachelor’s degree. For all these reasons, immigrants contribute importantly to the growth of the region’s labor force.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Interest and Action

Report Author: 
Michael Liu, Shauna Lo, and Paul Watanabe
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Oct

Findings from a survey of Asian American attitudes on immigrants, immigration, and action. The survey is based on over 400 Chinese and Vietnamese American respondents in Boston and Quincy, MA. The survey found general support for immigrants and immigrant rights. It also found general sympathy for Latino demands and a willingness to become active around these issues.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts