Research

Understanding "Sanctuary Cities"

Report Author: 
Christopher N. Lasch et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Produced by a group of law professors interested in the intersection of immigration enforcement and criminal law, this article asserts that "sanctuary" jurisdictions are following policies "informed by sound legal principles and considered policy judgments about how local resources should be used." The "Trump administration's reliance on white nationalist themes" and the false characterization of "sanctuary cities" as propagating immigrant crime have also raised concerns about discriminatory intent in the administration of immigration law and have forced local authorities to articulate thei

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Source Organization: 
Other

Dreams deferred: Contextualizing the health and psychosocial needs of undocumented Asian and Pacific Islander young adults in Northern California

Report Author: 
Sudhinarase, M., Ling, I., To, T. M., Melo, J., & Quach, T.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

While Latinos comprise the largest population of undocumented immigrants in the country, Asian and Pacific Islanders (API) are the fastest growing immigrant population in the U.S. and account for 1.5 million of the total 11.2 undocumented immigrants. The literature show that API immigrants, in general, are less likely to seek for mental health services. Moreover, there is little information on the psychosocial needs of undocumented APIs. Thus, this study uses the social capital theory to examine the psychosocial needs and health status of undocumented API young adults.

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Other

Coming of Age on the Margins: Mental Health and Wellbeing Among Latino Immigrant Young Adults Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Report Author: 
Rachel Siemons, Marissa Raymond-Flesh, Colette L. Auerswald, Claire D. Brindis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Undocumented immigrant Latino young adults face discrimination, marginalization, and are restricted from accessing critical resources such as health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Moreover, the fear and stressors associated with the possibility of being deported can affect the mental health and wellbeing (MHWB) of undocumented immigrants. This study aims to assess the effects of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) on the MHWB of 61 Latino young adults using the ecological framework.

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Other

Racism, the immigration enforcement regime, and the implications for racial inequality in the lives of undocumented young adults

Report Author: 
Aranda, E., & Vaquera, E.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jan

Despite the fact that living without legal documentation in the U.S. is considered a civil offense, undocumented immigrants are often depicted and treated as criminals. As a result, undocumented immigrants are subjected to policing and disciplining, such as detainment and use of ankle monitoring device, that are reserved for people who commit serious criminal offenses. Moreover, during President Barrack Obama's presidency, mass deportation reached an all-time high that only sustained the fears and anxiety of undocumented immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

The impact of immigration and customs enforcement on immigrant health: Perceptions of immigrants in Everett, Massachusetts, USA

Report Author: 
Hacker, K., Chu, J., Leung, C., Marra, R., Pirie, A., Brahimi, M., Marlin, R. P.
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Aug

A series of focus groups were conducted in Everett, MA - a community with a sizeable foreign-born population - and were offered in Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Arabic, and English for immigrants of other backgrounds. Documented (37%) and undocumented (63%) participants across all the focus groups described living with a constant fear of deportation, either for themselves or their loved ones.

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Other

The psychosocial impact of detention and deportation on U.S. migrant children and families

Report Author: 
Brabeck, K.M., Likes, M.B., & Hunter, C.
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Nov

Mixed status families - a family in which individuals have different immigration statuses but at least one member is unauthorized - are increasingly common in the U.S. Millions of U.S. citizen children have parents at risk of deportation. A parent's detention or deportation can precipitate a family crisis, particularly since detention tends to be abrupt and does not allow time for preparations. Detainees may be transferred to facilities far from their homes, limiting the ability of children to visit their parents.

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Other

Fear by association: Perceptions of anti-immigrant policy and health outcomes

Report Author: 
Vargas, E.D., Sanchez, G.R., & Juarez, M.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

In an era of mass deportation and anti-immigrant policies, a "culture of fear" exists among many in immigrant and Latinx communities. Anti-immigrant policies can create hostile sociopolitical environments, and as punitive immigration enforcement becomes increasingly common, those who feel "hunted" by ICE can experience intense feelings of anxiety, fear, and depression. Discrimination experienced by immigrants can also lead to chronic stress, which negatively impacts both physical and mental health.

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Other

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration

Report Author: 
National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Editors: Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

In an effort to understand the economic and fiscal impacts of immigration on the United States, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine convened a distinguished panel of 22 economists, sociologists, and demographers, chaired by Francine D. Blau, of the Department of Economics at Cornell University. In a study process lasting three years, the panel pored over the existing scholarly literature and secured input from experts around the United States.

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Other

Comparing trauma exposure, mental health needs, and service utilization across clinical samples of refugee, immigrant, and US-Origin children

Report Author: 
Betancourt, T. S., Newnham, E. A., Birman, D., Lee, R., Ellis, B. H., & Layne, C. M
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the experiences of immigrant children differ from refugee youth, both groups experience stressors associated with acculturation, resettlement, and potential abuse or community violence. Mental health care is underutilized among refugee youth given that most services do not take into account distinct traumatic experiences and histories resulting from war-related violence.

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Other

Unaccompanied migrant children in the United States: Predictors of placement stability in long term foster care

Report Author: 
Crea, T. M., Lopez, A., Taylor, T., Underwood, D.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Beginning in 2011, there was an increase of unaccompanied children from the Central American Northern Triangle (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras,) entering the U.S. While many children were placed with adult sponsors, about 5%-35% remain in long term foster care (LTFC) waiting for deportation hearings. Research has shown that instability in the foster system such as moving frequently has led to poor outcomes.

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Other