Latin American immigrants

Is Border Enforcement Effective? What We Know and What It Means

Report Author: 
Edward Alden
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

For the first time, evidence is now available to settle the ongoing debate between the "enforcers," i.e. people who believe that strengthened border enforcement can significantly reduce illegal immigration, and their critics, who believe that economic opportunity would continue to drive illegal migration despite the billions of dollars spent on border security. According to the author of this essay, the enforcers have won the argument.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Zero Undocumented Population Growth Is Here to Stay and Immigration Reform Would Preserve and Extend These Gains

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This report shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the Great Recession had little, if any, role in reducing the growth of the undocumented population in the United States. Rather, the population stopped growing because of greater scrutiny of air travel after 9/11, additional resources dedicated to southern border enforcement since the mid-nineties, improved economic and demographic conditions in Mexico, and the ability of some undocumented immigrants (those who overstayed their temporary visas) to acquire legal status.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Taking Giant Leaps Forward: Experiences of a Range of DACA Beneficiaries at the 5-Year Mark

Report Author: 
Roberto G. Gonazalez et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This brief describes the impact of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on a particularly vulnerable segment of the DACA-eligible population:  high school dropouts and those whose educations had been interrupted because of financial, legal, and motivational barriers. Based on interviews with 319 such individuals in Arizona, California, Georgia, Illinois, New York, and South Carolina, the report concludes that DACA has been instrumental in opening up important educational and career pathways for this population.

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Source Organization: 
American Federation of Teachers

UC Berkeley's undocumented student program: Holistic strategies for undocumented students equitable success across higher education

Report Author: 
Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez and Meng L. So
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Sep

The Undocumented Students Program (USP) established in 2012 at the University of California Berkeley was the first program at a U.S. university designed to support undocumented college students. The USP provides academic support, legal services, financial aid resources, and outside referrals.

Source Organization: 
Other

Daring to Dream: Sustaining Support for Undocumented Students at The Evergreen State College

Report Author: 
Grace Huerta and Catalina Ocampo
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

The election of President Donald Trump has heightened fears among undocumented immigrants. While Plyler v. Doe protects students at the K-12 level, accessibility and resources for undocumented students wishing to pursue higher education are limited. Student organizers across the country have been demanding higher education institutions to declare their position as sanctuary campuses. Such a designation entails that the university will protect its undocumented immigrants through refusing cooperation with ICE agents and allocating funds to support undocumented students.

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Other

The Role of Faculty, Counselors, and Support Programs on Latino/a Community College Students’ Success and Intent to Persist

Report Author: 
Esau Tovar
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Oct

Community colleges serve as the primary point of entry into higher education for more than 50% of all Latinx college students, including those studying to earn certificates or associate's degrees as well as those hoping to transfer to four-year institutions. This study utilized a sample of Latinx community college students in California (75% of whom were first-generation students). The results demonstrated that participation in student support programs had a small but significant impact on both a student's academic success as well as their intent to pursue degree completion.

Source Organization: 
American Federation of Teachers

How are Refugees Faring: Integration at U.S. and State Levels

Report Author: 
Michael Fix, Kate Hoper, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This study looks at the educational and economic outcomes of five refugee communities (Vietnamese, Cuban, Russian, Iraqi and Burmese) in four states (California, Florida, New York and Texas).  The key question is whether the location of refugee resettlement has a significant impact on refugee integration.  This has been described as “the lottery effect” – the idea that refugees’ lives are impacted by being placed in locales with very different labor markets, costs of living and social safety nets.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Cuban Migration: A Postrevolution Exodus Ebbs and Flows

Report Author: 
Jorge Duany
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

This article examines the history of Cuban emigration and the political context within which it has occurred. While there was Cuban migration to the U.S. before the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the scale of that migration increased greatly afterwards. The author divides migration since 1959 into five phases and notes that the socioeconomic characteristics of migrants changes with each new phase. The first wave from 1959 and 1962 consisted largely of the upper and middle classes; later, Cuban migrants increasingly resembled labor migrants coming from other countries.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Sanctuary Networks

Report Author: 
Pratheepan Gulasekaram and Rose Cuison Villazor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

In light of heightened immigration enforcement, the term ‘sanctuary’ has been increasingly popular in the media and amongst immigration rights advocates. This article defines sanctuary as a range of policies adopted by public and private entities which seek to limit participation in federal immigration enforcement practices to engage in deliberate non-cooperation with immigration policy. The article offers a concise overview of the history of the sanctuary movement and explores how concepts of sanctuary have evolved in the context of hyper-enforcement within immigration policy. 

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Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute
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