Civil Rights

Municipal Suffrage, Sanctuary Cities, and the Contested Meaning of Citizenship

Report Author: 
Kenneth Stahl
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Adapted from his forthcoming book, The Democratic City: Local Citizenship in the Time of Globalization, this blog post by Kenneth Stahl examines how differing rules regarding suffrage at the local and federal level suggest the existence of different models of citizenship. For example, while San Francisco, Chicago and a few municipalities in Maryland grant non-citizens the right to vote in certain local elections, these individuals are barred from voting in state and federal elections.

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Immigration policies and mental health morbidity among Latinos: A state-level analysis

Report Author: 
Hatzenbuehler, M.L., Prins, S.J., Flake, M., Philbin, M., Frazer, M.S., Hagen, D., & Hirsch, J.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

Social workers understand the importance of analyzing their client in the context of their environment. Macro structures (e.g. policy) have a direct impact on the mental health disparities and vulnerabilities of Latino populations. According to research by Hatzenbuehler et al. (2017), Latinos living in environments with exclusionary immigration policies and climates have significantly higher rates of poor mental health days than Latinos in less exclusionary environments.

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Defending criminal(ized) aliens after Padilla: Toward a more holistic public immigration defense in the era of crimmigration

Report Author: 
Andres Dae Keun Kwon
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 May

In 2010 under Padilla v. Kentucky, the Supreme Court issued that criminal defense attorneys, including public defenders, must advise their clients about the potential immigration implications of their criminal case. In response, many legal firms began hiring immigration experts to supplement their legal team. In 1997, the trailblazing Bronx Defenders (BxD), a legal firm offering free legal counsel, adopted a holistic approach to legal services.

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Immigration and the War on Crime: Law and Order Politics and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996

Report Author: 
Patrisia Macías-Rojas
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This study focuses on events leading up to the passage of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) of 1996 that recast undocumented immigration as a crime and fused immigration enforcement with crime control. The author suggests that the act may have had less to do with immigration and more to do with "crime politics and the policies of mass incarceration" that dominated the national discourse in the 25 years preceding passage of the act.

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What We Know and Need to Know About Immigrant Access to Justice

Report Author: 
Ellinor R. Jordan
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Oct

This article begins by presenting a review of research on the impact of legal representation in removal cases. A consistent finding is that the amount and quality of representation play a marked role in the outcome of hearings. Litigants without representation or with poor representation are much more likely to be removed and moreover, to not fully understand the implications of pleas and agreements they may make. The author suggests that in addition to poor outcomes for litigants, this situation reduces the overall efficiency of the justice system.

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DREAM Act-Eligible Poised to Build on the Investments Made in Them

Report Author: 
Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Political debate has intensified over "Dreamers" -- immigrants who were brought to the United States as children without authorization. In this paper, Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren from the Center for Migration Studies argue that granting Dreamers a path to citizenship would capitalize on the educational investments already made in them and boost their already high economic productivity.

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Power of the Purse: How Sub-Saharan Africans Contribute to the U.S. Economy

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This brief provides timely information on the economic contributions of sub-Saharan African Immigrants, a group that has been given relatively little attention in immigration research. A major theme is that African immigrants are making contributions larger than their numbers would suggest. The authors calculate that, in 2015, African immigrants had approximately $40.3 billion in spending power and paid $14.8 billion in federal, state, and local taxes. African immigrants tend to be in their prime working age and have a much higher labor force participation rate than U.S.

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The Value of Family-Based Immigration

Report Author: 
Greg Chen and Diane Rish
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

The Trump administration seeks to make drastic cuts to America's family-based immigration system and uses the pejorative term "chain migration" to refer to the immigration of close family members. This paper by the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) describes the categories of relatives who are eligible to come to the U.S. through the family immigration system and the various hoops they must jump through before being awarded an immigrant visa.

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A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

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Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

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