Demographics

Immigration and the War on Crime: Law and Order Politics and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996

Report Author: 
Patrisia Macías-Rojas
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This study focuses on events leading up to the passage of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) of 1996 that recast undocumented immigration as a crime and fused immigration enforcement with crime control. The author suggests that the act may have had less to do with immigration and more to do with "crime politics and the policies of mass incarceration" that dominated the national discourse in the 25 years preceding passage of the act.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Middle Eastern and North African Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Mattea Cumoletti and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This report updates a 2015 MPI profile of Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) immigrants. These immigrants now represent 3 percent of the approximately 44 million immigrants in the U.S. The report discusses the socioeconomic characteristics of the MENA population as gleaned from census and other data. Each data point is compared with the immigrant population in general and the native-born population. For example, in 2016, 43 percent of MENA immigrants (ages 25 and above) had a bachelor's degree or higher, compared to 30 percent of all immigrants and 32 percent of native-born adults.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

What the Data Tells Us About Immigrant Executives in the U.S.

Report Author: 
Sami Mahroum and Rashid Ansari
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Google's Sergey Brin and Tesla's Elon Musk provide just two modern examples of well-known immigrant CEOs; however, despite the long history of immigrant contributions to American business, little research has been done to better understand the role of immigrant leadership in corporate America.

Source Organization: 
Other

DREAM Act-Eligible Poised to Build on the Investments Made in Them

Report Author: 
Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Political debate has intensified over "Dreamers" -- immigrants who were brought to the United States as children without authorization. In this paper, Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren from the Center for Migration Studies argue that granting Dreamers a path to citizenship would capitalize on the educational investments already made in them and boost their already high economic productivity.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Power of the Purse: How Sub-Saharan Africans Contribute to the U.S. Economy

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This brief provides timely information on the economic contributions of sub-Saharan African Immigrants, a group that has been given relatively little attention in immigration research. A major theme is that African immigrants are making contributions larger than their numbers would suggest. The authors calculate that, in 2015, African immigrants had approximately $40.3 billion in spending power and paid $14.8 billion in federal, state, and local taxes. African immigrants tend to be in their prime working age and have a much higher labor force participation rate than U.S.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Rethinking English Learner Data: Illinois' Plans Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

Report Author: 
Janie Tankard Carnock
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This report provides an analysis of Illinois' innovative approach to producing and analyzing data on English language learners (ELLs). The federal Office of Education approved Illinois' plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), including its approach to managing data, in August of 2017. Unlike other states, which combine current and former ELLs into one group, Illinois will keep the two groups separate and distinct and collect data on "former ELs" through grade 12.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Ready to work: Understanding Immigrant Skills in the United States to Build a Competitive Workforce

Report Author: 
Rob Paral
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

In order to maximize the potential of foreign-born workers in the U.S., policy makers and practitioners in the workforce development field must first understand the diverse characteristics, assets and needs of immigrants. This report provides a detailed portrait of the foreign-born working population in the U.S., emphasizing sociodemographic characteristics, immigration status, geographic distribution, and levels of education and training.

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Source Organization: 
Other

The Value of Family-Based Immigration

Report Author: 
Greg Chen and Diane Rish
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

The Trump administration seeks to make drastic cuts to America's family-based immigration system and uses the pejorative term "chain migration" to refer to the immigration of close family members. This paper from the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) describes the categories of relatives who are eligible to come to the U.S. through the family immigration system and the various hoops they must jump through before being awarded an immigrant visa.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Child Care Choices of Low-Income, Immigrant Families with Young Children: Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education

Report Author: 
Heather Sandstrom & Julia Gelatt
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Immigrants' use of early childhood care and education has been the topic of numerous studies, but what factors drive immigrant caregivers' use of these services? In this report, the authors use National Survey of Early Care and Education data to explore child-care decisions of immigrant and U.S.-born families. Noting that the most salient differences are not always between immigrant and non-immigrant parents, the authors emphasize the distinction between children of recent immigrants with low English proficiency (LEP) and children of U.S.

Source Organization: 
The Urban Institute

Will DREAMers Crowd U.S.-Born Millennials Out of Jobs?

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova & Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

This "commentary" piece challenges the argument that legislation to regularize the status of DREAMers will adversely affect the job prospects of U.S.-born millennials.  The authors bring forth three main arguments to support their position. First, DREAMers represent a very small share of the overall millennial population nation-wide (about 1 percent); second, DREAMers tend to be concentrated in states like California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida. These states account for just 33 percent of Black and 28 percent of White millennials.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute
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