California

Parental perspectives on parent-child conflict and acculturation in Iranian immigrants in California

Report Author: 
Elmira Jannati and Stuart Allen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Acculturation--defined as "moving toward a (new) culture"--is a process that can impact many aspects of life for immigrants and their families. Older and younger immigrant generations may not engage to the same extent with the host culture in their new country. These acculturation gaps are often evident when examining relationships between immigrant parents and their children.

Source Organization: 
Other

Supporting Dual Language Learner Success in Superdiverse PreK-3 Classrooms: The Sobrato Early Academic Language Model

Report Author: 
Anya Hurwitz & Laurie Olsen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

While the characteristics of monolingual, bilingual, or dual language classrooms for young children are widely understood and well covered in the educational literature, there appears to be an information void regarding the "superdiverse" classroom, defined by this study as one "with at least five language groups represented, and without a critical mass of any one language group in a classroom that would make dual-language/bilingual instruction feasible." Too often in these settings, the importance of primary language skills to English language development is overlooked or discounted.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

New Americans in San Diego

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The immigrant population in San Diego County (CA), after growing 8.5 percent between 2011 and 2016, now constitutes 24.1 percent of the County's population. The fact sheet from New American Economy offers demographic, economic, education, housing, and immigration status data on immigrants in the County, as well as two profiles of local immigrant entrepreneurs. Using an analysis of government data including the 2011 and 2016 American Community Surveys and datasets from the Bureau of Economic Analysis and U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

Dreams deferred: Contextualizing the health and psychosocial needs of undocumented Asian and Pacific Islander young adults in Northern California

Report Author: 
Sudhinarase, M., Ling, I., To, T. M., Melo, J., & Quach, T.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

While Latinos comprise the largest population of undocumented immigrants in the country, Asian and Pacific Islanders (API) are the fastest growing immigrant population in the U.S. and account for 1.5 million of the total 11.2 undocumented immigrants. The literature show that API immigrants, in general, are less likely to seek for mental health services. Moreover, there is little information on the psychosocial needs of undocumented APIs. Thus, this study uses the social capital theory to examine the psychosocial needs and health status of undocumented API young adults.

Source Organization: 
Other

How are Refugees Faring: Integration at U.S. and State Levels

Report Author: 
Michael Fix, Kate Hoper, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This study looks at the educational and economic outcomes of five refugee communities (Vietnamese, Cuban, Russian, Iraqi and Burmese) in four states (California, Florida, New York and Texas).  The key question is whether the location of refugee resettlement has a significant impact on refugee integration.  This has been described as “the lottery effect” – the idea that refugees’ lives are impacted by being placed in locales with very different labor markets, costs of living and social safety nets.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Providing driver’s licenses to unauthorized immigrants in California improves traffic safety

Report Author: 
Hans Luedersa, Jens Hainmuellera and Duncan Lawrence
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Nov

This paper presents an analysis of the impact of a law passed in California (AB60) providing driver's licenses to unauthorized immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Evolving and Diversifying Nature of Migration to the U.S.-Mexican Border

Report Author: 
Jessica Bolter
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

Due to historically low levels of Mexican migration in recent years, unauthorized migrants through the southern border are now more likely to come from Central American countries, such as El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, as well as from countries in the Caribbean, Asia and Africa. This article argues that policy changes are necessary given the growing diversity of arrivals.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Creating Cohesive, Coherent Immigration Policy

Report Author: 
Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Creating Cohesive, Coherent Immigration Policy

For anyone wanting a lesson in some of the contradictions apparent in U.S. immigration law, this article is a good starting point. Examples of these contradictions include:  trying to limit illegal immigration through strict border control while tolerating lax interior enforcement.

Source Organization: 
Other

The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million

Report Author: 
Robert Warren & Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The 2,000 Mile Wall in Search of a Purpose: Since 2007 Visa Overstays have Outnumbered Undocumented Border Crossers by a Half Million

Not only are "visa overstays," i.e. people who entered on valid visas but remained beyond their period of authorized stay, a growing portion of the undocumented population (42 percent of the total undocumented population in 2014), they now constitute the majority of all new undocumented people, e.g.

Source Organization: 
Other
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