New England

Multi-tier mental health program for refugee youth

Report Author: 
Ellis, B.H., Miller, A.B., Abdi, S., Barrett, C., Blood, E.A., & Betancourt, T.S.
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

The research literature indicates that a lack of resources has a significant impact on the overall psychosocial well-being of refugee youth, perhaps playing an even larger role in predicting psychological distress than the experience of trauma itself. Taking into account environmental factors, including resource hardships and acculturative stresses, is crucial for any intervention promoting the mental well-being of refugee youth. The authors of this study report preliminary findings from an intervention implemented with Somali refugee middle school students in New England.

Source Organization: 
Other

Demand for H-1B Visas in New England: An Analysis of Employer Requests for Highly Skilled Guest Workers

Report Author: 
Robert Clifford
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Oct

Demand for H-1B Visas in New England: An Analysis of Employer Requests for Highly Skilled Guest Workers

Demand for H-1B visas in New England explains the mechanics of the H-1B visa program, discusses how the program is utilized in New England and elsewhere, and makes recommendations to revamp the program so that it garners greater public support and meets the needs of the economy.

Source Organization: 
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

The Academic Achievement of Latino Students in Boston Public Schools

Report Author: 
Faye Karp
Original Date of Publication: 
2012 Apr

This report examines the SY2006-SY2009 MCAS ELA and Math achievement of Latino students in Boston Public Schools. It finds that Latino students constitute the largest racial/ethnic student group in Boston Public Schools (43.0 percent in SY2012) and the only racial/ethnic group to grow in numbers from SY2006 to SY2009. In SY2009, Latino students had the highest rates of poverty, mobility, chronic absence and grade retention in Boston Public Schools.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers, Second Edition

Report Author: 
Alan Clayton-Matthews and Paul Watanabe
Original Date of Publication: 
2012 Mar

Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers, Second Edition: Demographic Characteristics and Economic Footprint contains the most credible information to date on immigration in Massachusetts.  

Source Organization: 
The Immigrant Learning Center, Inc.

Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Hondurans and Colombians: A Scan of Needs of Recent Latin American Immigrants to the Boston Area (Summary of findings)

Report Author: 
Miren Uriarte, Phil Granberry, Megan Halloran, Susan Kelly, Rob Kramer, Sandra Winkler with Jennifer Murillo, Udaya Wagle and Randall Wilson
Original Date of Publication: 
2003 Dec

This report focuses on four groups of recent Latin American immigrants to the Boston area — Guatemalans, Hondurans, Salvadorans and Colombians — about whom relatively little is known.  Although these groups have been represented in the Boston area for several decades, their numbers leaped in the 1990s, contributing notably to the growing diversity both of our region and of the Latino population.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Hondurans and Colombians: A scan of needs of recent Latin American immigrants to the Boston area

Report Author: 
Miren Uriarte, Phil Granberry, Megan Halloran, Susan Kelly, Rob Kramer, Sandra Winkler with Jennifer Murillo, Udaya Wagle and Randall Wilson
Original Date of Publication: 
2003 Dec

The 2000 U.S. Census brought confirmation of the increase of the Latino population and of the growing diversity of Latino national groups that now make this region their home. Latinos now number 428,729, a 55% increase over their numbers in 1990.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

When They Need Help the Most: Immigration Status and Access to Public Services

Report Author: 
Miren Uriarte and Philip Granberry
Original Date of Publication: 
2006 Dec

Ending unauthorized immigration is at the heart of current federal initiatives in both immigration and social policy. The intertwining of these two areas of policy is nowhere clearer than in the 1996 passage of both the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), better known as Welfare Reform, and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA). Immigration status became a key point of differentiation in access to public benefits.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Latinos in Massachusetts Selected Areas: Lowell

Report Author: 
Phillip Granberry and Sarah Rustan
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Sep

This report provides a descriptive snapshot of selected economic, social, educational and demographic indicators pertaining to Latinos in Lowell. It analyzes data from the 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The ACS's smallest geographic area is a Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) consisting of a minimum census population of 100,000. Lowell is a large enough city that it constitutes a PUMA by itself. The ACS thereby enables us to arrive at a demographic and economic portrait of Lowell's Latino community.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Latinos in Massachusetts Selected Areas: Lawrence and Methuen

Report Author: 
Phillip Granberry and Sarah Rustan
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Sep

This report provides a descriptive snapshot of selected economic, social, educational and demographic indicators pertaining to Latinos in the cities of Lawrence and Methuen. It analyzes data from the 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The ACS's smallest geographic area is a Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) consisting of a minimum census population of 100,000.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Latinos in Massachusetts Selected Areas: Holyoke, Chicopee and Easthampton

Report Author: 
Phillip Granberry and Sarah Rustan
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Sep

This report provides a descriptive snapshot of selected economic, social, educational and demographic indicators pertaining to Latinos in the cities of Holyoke, Chicopee and Easthampton. It analyzes data from the 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The ACS's smallest geographic area is a Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA) consisting of a minimum census population of 100,000.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts
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