National

How Might Restricting Immigration Affect Social Security's Finances

Report Author: 
Damir Cosic and Richard W. Johnson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Most economists agree that immigration boosts productivity, raises the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and prevents labor shortages. In 2016, one in six workers in the United States was an immigrant. These immigrant workers finance a major share of Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI) payroll taxes that fund Social Security.

Source Organization: 
The Urban Institute

Power of the Purse: How Sub-Saharan Africans Contribute to the U.S. Economy

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This brief provides timely information on the economic contributions of sub-Saharan African Immigrants, a group that has been given relatively little attention in immigration research. A major theme is that African immigrants are making contributions larger than their numbers would suggest. The authors calculate that, in 2015, African immigrants had approximately $40.3 billion in spending power and paid $14.8 billion in federal, state, and local taxes. African immigrants tend to be in their prime working age and have a much higher labor force participation rate than U.S.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

New Opportunities? ESSA and Its Implications for Dual Language Learners and ECEC Workforce Development

Report Author: 
Delia Pompa, Maki Park and Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, the successor legislation to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, provides new opportunities to integrate early childhood education and care (ECEC) with K-12 education. This has special importance for dual language learners who now represent 32 percent of all children under the age of 5.  This report details all of the mechanisms available under the Act to strengthen ECEC for immigrant children.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Beyond Teaching English: Supporting High School Completion by Immigrant and Refugee Students

Report Author: 
Julie Sugarman
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

This report examines the ways in which selected school districts across the United States are providing services for immigrant and refugee students who are high school aged, particularly those entering school with limited formal education in their country of origin. Based on research and feedback from schools participating in the Learning Network for Newcomer Youth Success, the author focuses on a few key points.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Expanding the Dream: Engaging Immigrant Youth and Adults in Post-Secondary and Adult Education

Report Author: 
Duy Pham and Wendy Cervantes
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

The authors of this brief argue that while the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) has had a positive impact both on the lives of the undocumented immigrants who signed up for it and on the country as a whole, it is not enough, and an updated DREAM act should be passed that provides a lasting reform of the nation's immigration laws.

Source Organization: 
Other

Ready to work: Understanding Immigrant Skills in the United States to Build a Competitive Workforce

Report Author: 
Rob Paral
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

In order to maximize the potential of foreign-born workers in the U.S., policy makers and practitioners in the workforce development field must first understand the diverse characteristics, assets and needs of immigrants. This report provides a detailed portrait of the foreign-born working population in the U.S., emphasizing sociodemographic characteristics, immigration status, geographic distribution, and levels of education and training.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

The Value of Family-Based Immigration

Report Author: 
Greg Chen and Diane Rish
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

The Trump administration seeks to make drastic cuts to America's family-based immigration system and uses the pejorative term "chain migration" to refer to the immigration of close family members. This paper by the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) describes the categories of relatives who are eligible to come to the U.S. through the family immigration system and the various hoops they must jump through before being awarded an immigrant visa.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Child Care Choices of Low-Income, Immigrant Families with Young Children: Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education

Report Author: 
Heather Sandstrom & Julia Gelatt
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Immigrants' use of early childhood care and education has been the topic of numerous studies, but what factors drive immigrant caregivers' use of these services? In this report, the authors use National Survey of Early Care and Education data to explore child-care decisions of immigrant and U.S.-born families. Noting that the most salient differences are not always between immigrant and non-immigrant parents, the authors emphasize the distinction between children of recent immigrants with low English proficiency (LEP) and children of U.S.

Source Organization: 
The Urban Institute

Will DREAMers Crowd U.S.-Born Millennials Out of Jobs?

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova & Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

This "commentary" piece challenges the argument that legislation to regularize the status of DREAMers will adversely affect the job prospects of U.S.-born millennials.  The authors bring forth three main arguments to support their position. First, DREAMers represent a very small share of the overall millennial population nation-wide (about 1 percent); second, DREAMers tend to be concentrated in states like California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida. These states account for just 33 percent of Black and 28 percent of White millennials.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Wages and High-Skilled Immigration: How the Government Calculates Prevailing Wages and Why It Matters

Report Author: 
Amy Marmer Nice
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

The H-1B temporary work classification is an immigration status that allows U.S. employers to hire foreign nationals to work in a "specialty occupation" or a highly skilled position that typically requires a bachelor's degree. An employer applying for an H-1B worker must satisfy the prevailing wage requirement for hiring an immigrant worker, i.e.

Source Organization: 
Other
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