National

Cuban Migration: A Postrevolution Exodus Ebbs and Flows

Report Author: 
Jorge Duany
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

This article examines the history of Cuban emigration and the political context within which it has occurred. While there was Cuban migration to the U.S. before the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the scale of that migration increased greatly afterwards. The author divides migration since 1959 into five phases and notes that the socioeconomic characteristics of migrants changes with each new phase. The first wave from 1959 and 1962 consisted largely of the upper and middle classes; later, Cuban migrants increasingly resembled labor migrants coming from other countries.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjal and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Despite making up only 13 percent of the total U.S. population, immigrants represent a vital portion of the growing health-care industry comprising 17 percent, or 2.1 million, of the 12.4 million medical professionals in the United States. This report uses data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2015 American Community Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics to provide a demographic and socioeconomic overview of immigrants working in health-care occupations with particular attention to their proficiency in English, educational background, nationality, gender, and access to health insurance.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

State Policies on Immigrant Integration: An Examination of Best Practices and Policy Diffusion

Report Author: 
Allan Colbern and Karthick Ramakrishnan
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Feb

This paper focuses on actions being taken by states, counties and municipalities that bolster immigrant integration.  The authors believe that since comprehensive immigration reform is stalled at the federal level, these sub-federal level activities are growing in importance and influence.  Drawing on research and the input of participants in several focus group discussions, the authors review findings in four specific domains: policymaking, implementation, organizational capacity and community-engaged research.  For each topic, they provide examples from multiple locales and

Source Organization: 
Other

U.S. Leadership Forsaken: Six Months of the Trump Refugee Bans

Report Author: 
Human Rights First
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

In order to advance America’s foreign policy and national security interests, in addition to protecting of some of the world’s most vulnerable populations, the United States must be a global leader in the world’s refugee crises – not deliberately back down from it. U.S. Leadership Forsaken: Six Months of the Trump Refugee Bans published by Human Rights First examines the effects of the “travel ban” executive order of U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

Sanctuary Networks

Report Author: 
Pratheepan Gulasekaram and Rose Cuison Villazor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

In light of heightened immigration enforcement, the term ‘sanctuary’ has been increasingly popular in the media and amongst immigration rights advocates. This article defines sanctuary as a range of policies adopted by public and private entities which seek to limit participation in federal immigration enforcement practices to engage in deliberate non-cooperation with immigration policy. The article offers a concise overview of the history of the sanctuary movement and explores how concepts of sanctuary have evolved in the context of hyper-enforcement within immigration policy. 

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigration and Farm Labor: From Unauthorized to H-2A for Some?

Report Author: 
Philip Martin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

Although immigrant workers have long been employed on U.S. farms, shifting migration patterns and employer labor strategies are reshaping the agricultural workforce. Migration from Mexico to the United States has slowed with the the 2008–09 recession, improving conditions in rural Mexico, and stepped-up border enforcement.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Haitian Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jennifer Schulz and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

In recent decades, the United States has experienced a significant increase in the number of immigrants from Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. While just 5,000 Haitians lived in the United States in 1960, migrants from Haiti began arriving in larger numbers following the collapse of the Jean-Claude Duvalier dictatorship in the late 1980s. Beyond political instability, endemic poverty and natural disasters, including a devastating 2010 earthquake, have propelled migration to the United States, often by boat.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

On the Clock: How Immigrants Fill Gaps in the Labor Market by Working Nontraditional Hours

Report Author: 
Pavel Dramski, PhD
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

A new study from New American Economy shows that of the 30.2 million workers in America working the night shift, weekends, or other unusual working hours, nearly 5.5 million of them are foreign-born. The findings of the report are based on an analysis of the American Community Survey (ACS) and the American Time Use Survey (ATUS).

 

 

Source Organization: 
Other

From Struggle to Resilience: The Economic Impact of Refugees in America

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This study provides insight into a small and often misunderstood segment of the foreign-born population. While much of the political rhetoric describes what refugees cost the United States in the first eight months of their stay—the short period when they receive government resettlement assistance—this report clearly demonstrates the strong upward trajectory experienced by many refugee families in the country long term.

Source Organization: 
Other
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