National

The Ten Parts of 'Illegal' in 'Illegal Immigration' that I Do Not Understand

Report Author: 
Kari E. Hong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The author frames this paper as a response to the question often asked by those in favor of harsher immigration enforcement - "What part of illegal in illegal immigration do you not understand?" While the paper specifies ten distinct problems with the concept of "illegal immigrant," several themes arise. For example, the author refutes the idea that those who are undocumented are willingly in this status.

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Other

A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States

Report Author: 
Ryan Schultheis and Ariel G. Ruiz Soto
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Return migration to the United States by deportees from Mexico has slowed down significantly in the past decade. The Migration Policy Institute report, A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States, gives a statistical and demographic profile of Mexican adults returned by the United States government between 2005 and 2015 using data collected by the Mexican Interior Ministry.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Pre-Migration Trauma Exposure and Mental Health Functioning among Central American Migrants Arriving at the US Border

Report Author: 
Allen Keller, Amy Joscelyne, Megan Granski, Barry Rosenfeld
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jan

In recent years, the influx of families and children from Central America arriving at the US border has been deemed an "urgent humanitarian situation." Examining how the experiences of migrants correspond with the requirements for asylum status can powerfully inform public discourse and policy.  This report focuses on migrants from the Northern Triangle region, formed by El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, and considers their pre-migration trauma, current mental health functioning, reasons for leaving the region, and rate at which they appeared to satisfy the legal criteria for asylum

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Other

Organisational systems’ approaches to improving cultural competence in healthcare: a systematic scoping review of the literature

Report Author: 
Janya McCalman, Crystal Jongen, & Roxanne Bainbridge
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

Noting that the scope of cultural competence has expanded beyond the interpersonal domain to address system-level factors, the authors of this study set about to determine the evidence base for a systems approach to eliminating inequities in health care.

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Other

Beyond Economics: Fears of Cultural Displacement Pushed the White Working Class to Trump | PRRI/The Atlantic Report

Report Author: 
Daniel Cox, Ph.D., Rachel Lienesch, Robert P. Jones, Ph.D.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

The white working class voted for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 U.S. presidential election by a margin of roughly two to one. To illuminate the characteristics, attitudes and experiences that were most significant in predicting white working-class voters' support for Trump, researchers at the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tested a variety of demographic, cultural and economic factors before and after the election that may have influenced these voters.

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Other

Is Border Enforcement Effective? What We Know and What It Means

Report Author: 
Edward Alden
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

For the first time, evidence is now available to settle the ongoing debate between the "enforcers," i.e. people who believe that strengthened border enforcement can significantly reduce illegal immigration, and their critics, who believe that economic opportunity would continue to drive illegal migration despite the billions of dollars spent on border security. According to the author of this essay, the enforcers have won the argument.

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Other

Zero Undocumented Population Growth Is Here to Stay and Immigration Reform Would Preserve and Extend These Gains

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This report shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the Great Recession had little, if any, role in reducing the growth of the undocumented population in the United States. Rather, the population stopped growing because of greater scrutiny of air travel after 9/11, additional resources dedicated to southern border enforcement since the mid-nineties, improved economic and demographic conditions in Mexico, and the ability of some undocumented immigrants (those who overstayed their temporary visas) to acquire legal status.

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H-1B visa needs reform to make it fairer to migrant and American workers

Report Author: 
Daniel Costa
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

A more equitable job market for foreign- and U.S.-born workers alike is possible with reforms to the H-1B work visa program, asserts the Economic Policy Institute in this fact sheet. The publication outlines flaws in the H-1B program and suggests a series of reforms to protect both U.S. workers and "H-1B workers, who deserve fair pay for their work according to U.S. wage standards and who should not have to fear retaliation and exploitation by employers." The H-1B program provides non-immigrant U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

From Struggle to Resilience: The Economic Impact of Refugees in America

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Refugees living in the United States show a strong upward economic trajectory over time and make significant contributions to their new communities. This report uses data from the 2015 American Community Survey to examine 2.3 million likely refugees based on year of arrival in the U.S. and country of origin. The report finds that, although refugees in the U.S. for five years or less have a median household income of $22,000, that figure more than triples in subsequent decades, exceeding the median income of U.S. households overall.

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Other

Foreign-born STEM Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
American Immigration Council
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Foreign-born workers in the United States represent a growing share of the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce in all occupational categories. This fact sheet from the American Immigration Council analyzes data from the American Community Survey to give an overview of the occupational, gender, educational and geographic distribution of foreign-born STEM workers in the United States. It offers a side-by-side comparison of two sets of STEM occupations based on two different STEM definitions. The total number of STEM workers in the U.S.

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Other
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