Students

Children of Immigrants: National and State Characteristics

Report Author: 
Karina Fortuny, Randy Capps, Margaret Simms and Ajay Chaudry
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Aug

Children of Immigrants: National and State Characteristics (click to view report)

Source Organization: 
Immigrant Learning Center

Reading and Language Outcomes of a Five-Year Randomized Evaluation of Transitional Bilingual Education

Report Author: 
Robert E. Slavin, Nancy Madden, Margarita Calderón, Anne Chamberlain, Megan Hennessy
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Jan

Reading and Language Outcomes of a Five-Year Randomized Evaluation of Transitional Bilingual Education (click to view report)

Source Organization: 
Immigrant Learning Center

Ten Economic Facts about Immigration

Report Author: 
Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Sep

Ten Economic Facts about Immigration (click to view report)

Seeking "to provide a common ground that all participants in the policy debate (on immigration) can agree on,"  the authors provide a succinct and non-technical summary of available research on 10 key economic questions, including:

Source Organization: 
The Brookings Institution

Still an Hourglass? Immigrant workers in Middle-skilled Jobs (Report in Brief)

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix and Serena Yi-Ying Lin
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Sep

This report casts doubt on  the depiction of the immigrant workforce as an hourglass noting that almost a quarter of immigrants in 2006 were working in "middle skill" jobs compared to 29% of native-born Americans. Middle-skilled jobs are defined as "jobs that require more than a high school but less than a four-year college degree and that typically pay a family-sustaining wage ($30,000 annually per worker). In three of four specific occupations analyzed in the report (healthcare, IT and hospitality) the percent of immigrants actually exceeded that of native workers.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends 2010

Report Author: 
Jeffrey S. Passel and D’Vera Cohn
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Feb

This statistical analysis of the undocumented population updates previous annual reports published by the Pew Research Center. At 11.2 million in 2010, Pew's estimate of the national total of undocumented immigrants remains largely unchanged from 2009. During the previous two years (2007-2009), however, the number had declined from a high of 12 million in 2007. At the same time, the 2010 numbers show significant variations among the states. The decline in unauthorized numbers was especially great in New York and Florida, while increases occurred in Texas and Louisiana.

Source Organization: 
Pew Hispanic Center

Immigration Myths and Facts

Report Author: 
US Chamber of Commerce
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 May

In an effort to counteract misinformation about the impact of immigration on American society, the U.S. Chamber's Labor, Immigration and Employee Benefits Division prepared this pamphlet to "refute seven of the most common myths about immigrants coming to our country." The pamphlet "summarize[s] the facts on the relationship of immigrants to Jobs, Wages, Taxes, Population, Crime, Integration and Welfare." The Chamber's review "shows that immigrants significantly benefit the U.S. economy by creating new jobs, and complementing the skills of the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Immigrant Learning Center

An Action Agenda for ESOL

Report Author: 
Center for an Urban Future and Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Mar

This concept paper written by the Center for an Urban Future and the Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy includes eight recommendations for supporting and strengthening the state's English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programs. The action agenda, which was endorsed by an unusual coalition of the state's leading business groups, immigrant advocates, literacy providers and workforce training professionals, calls on New York policymakers to guarantee level funding for state-run ESOL programs even in this difficult fiscal environment.

Source Organization: 
Center for an Urban Future

Lost in Translation

Report Author: 
Tara Colton
Original Date of Publication: 
2006 Nov

This new report finds that while immigrants have become a growing part of the workforce in nearly every corner of New York State, the state-run English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program has not come close to keeping pace with the demand, creating a skills gap that could hurt the state's economic competitiveness.

Source Organization: 
Center for an Urban Future

Still Lost In Translation

Report Author: 
Tara Colton
Original Date of Publication: 
2007 Nov

This new report by the Center documents that immigrant entrepreneurs have emerged as a key engine of economic growth for cities from New York to Los Angeles--and, with the right support, could provide an even bigger boost to these cities in the years ahead.

Source Organization: 
Center for an Urban Future
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