Students

Comparing trauma exposure, mental health needs, and service utilization across clinical samples of refugee, immigrant, and US-Origin children

Report Author: 
Betancourt, T. S., Newnham, E. A., Birman, D., Lee, R., Ellis, B. H., & Layne, C. M
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the experiences of immigrant children differ from refugee youth, both groups experience stressors associated with acculturation, resettlement, and potential abuse or community violence. Mental health care is underutilized among refugee youth given that most services do not take into account distinct traumatic experiences and histories resulting from war-related violence.

Source Organization: 
Other

Multi-tier mental health program for refugee youth

Report Author: 
Ellis, B.H., Miller, A.B., Abdi, S., Barrett, C., Blood, E.A., & Betancourt, T.S.
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

The research literature indicates that a lack of resources has a significant impact on the overall psychosocial well-being of refugee youth, perhaps playing an even larger role in predicting psychological distress than the experience of trauma itself. Taking into account environmental factors, including resource hardships and acculturative stresses, is crucial for any intervention promoting the mental well-being of refugee youth. The authors of this study report preliminary findings from an intervention implemented with Somali refugee middle school students in New England.

Source Organization: 
Other

Addressing health disparities in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents through community-based participatory research: A study in 2 communities

Report Author: 
Bentancourt, T.S., Frounfelker, R., Mishra, T., Hussein, A., & Falzarano, R.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jul

Refugee youth have a much higher risk of experiencing psychological distress and mental health disorders than their non-refugee U.S. peers. Much of this elevated risk is due to "multiple acute and chronic stressors" that youth face throughout their refugee experience. To explore the mental health needs and community strengths of Somali Bantu and Bhutanese refugee youth in Massachusetts, this study utilized a community-based participatory research approach - a method that ensures the communities being studied are meaningfully involved at all research stages.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Education and Work Profiles of the DACA Population

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

The authors of this report applied their unique methodology to Census data to determine the characteristics of what they call the DACA “immediately eligible” population—those who have met all educational requirements for participation in the program. Past studies of this population have been survey-based, but have not been fully representative.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Sikhs in America: A History of Hate

Report Author: 
A.C. Thompson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

As monotheistic followers of a 15th century religion from South Asia, Sikh men refrain from shaving and wear turbans. In America, they are often victims of violence or abuse by those who confuse them for Muslims. Although there are an estimated 500,000 Sikhs currently living in the United States, they have long been the victims of xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment.

Source Organization: 
Other

Taking Giant Leaps Forward: Experiences of a Range of DACA Beneficiaries at the 5-Year Mark

Report Author: 
Roberto G. Gonazalez et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This brief describes the impact of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on a particularly vulnerable segment of the DACA-eligible population:  high school dropouts and those whose educations had been interrupted because of financial, legal, and motivational barriers. Based on interviews with 319 such individuals in Arizona, California, Georgia, Illinois, New York, and South Carolina, the report concludes that DACA has been instrumental in opening up important educational and career pathways for this population.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
American Federation of Teachers

Promising Practices in Immigrant Education Database

Report Author: 
N/A
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

CCCIE's database of promising practices in immigrant education provides community colleges with "an opportunity to learn from one another, share new ideas, and expand and improve their programs to serve immigrant students." The database organizes promising practices into five major types of programs or initiatives:  Comprehensive Support Services, ESL Programs, Workforce Training/Career Development, Community/Employer Partnerships, Citizenship/Civics Preparation, and Inclusive Practices for Undocumented Students.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant college students' academic obstacles

Report Author: 
Krista Soria and Michael Stebleton
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Academic self-efficacy refers to "students' confidence in their ability to undertake academic tasks". Research has shown that a college student's beliefs of their own academic self-efficacy highly predict their academic performance and persistence in their academic program. Increased academic self-efficacy can also positively impact how a student responds to adversity and copes with the demands of a college education.

Source Organization: 
Other

UC Berkeley's undocumented student program: Holistic strategies for undocumented students equitable success across higher education

Report Author: 
Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez and Meng L. So
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Sep

The Undocumented Students Program (USP) established in 2012 at the University of California Berkeley was the first program at a U.S. university designed to support undocumented college students. The USP provides academic support, legal services, financial aid resources, and outside referrals.

Source Organization: 
Other

Daring to Dream: Sustaining Support for Undocumented Students at The Evergreen State College

Report Author: 
Grace Huerta and Catalina Ocampo
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

The election of President Donald Trump has heightened fears among undocumented immigrants. While Plyler v. Doe protects students at the K-12 level, accessibility and resources for undocumented students wishing to pursue higher education are limited. Student organizers across the country have been demanding higher education institutions to declare their position as sanctuary campuses. Such a designation entails that the university will protect its undocumented immigrants through refusing cooperation with ICE agents and allocating funds to support undocumented students.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other
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