Students

Child Care Choices of Low-Income, Immigrant Families with Young Children: Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education

Report Author: 
Heather Sandstrom & Julia Gelatt
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Immigrants' use of early childhood care and education has been the topic of numerous studies, but what factors drive immigrant caregivers' use of these services? In this report, the authors use National Survey of Early Care and Education data to explore child-care decisions of immigrant and U.S.-born families. Noting that the most salient differences are not always between immigrant and non-immigrant parents, the authors emphasize the distinction between children of recent immigrants with low English proficiency (LEP) and children of U.S.

Source Organization: 
The Urban Institute

Living in an Immigrant Family in America: How Fear and Toxic Stress are affecting Daily Life, Well-Being, & Health

Report Author: 
Samantha Artiga & Petry Ubri
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

According to this report, immigrant families from various backgrounds are living with increased fear and uncertainty due to the current political climate. The election of Donald Trump has led to policies that increase immigration enforcement and restrict the entry of immigrants from selected countries. These policies can potentially impact 23 million non-citizens who live in the United States, as well as 12 million children who are predominantly U.S.-born.

Source Organization: 
Other

A Profile of Current DACA Recipients by Education, Industry, and Occupation

Report Author: 
Jie Zong, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Jeanne Batalova, Julia Gelatt, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

In September 2017, the Trump administration announced it would discontinue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which granted temporary legal protection against deportation for unauthorized immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. Using recent data from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), MPI researchers have prepared this educational and occupational profile of individuals currently holding DACA status. Among the key findings is that DACA recipients are almost as likely as U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Diversifying the Classroom: Examining the Teacher Pipeline

Report Author: 
Constance A. Lindsay et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

A look into any urban school classroom reveals how diverse student populations have become. The same, however, cannot be said for the teaching staff. Diversifying the Classroom: Examining the Teacher Pipeline seeks to understand the reasons for America's predominantly white workforce in education. Research shows that students of color perform better with a teacher of the same race or ethnicity; therefore, a diverse teacher workforce is crucial for improving student performance outcomes.

Source Organization: 
Other

Differing DREAMs: Estimating the Unauthorized Populations that Could Benefit under Different Legalization Bills, Migration Policy Institute

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Sarah Pierce, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

In 2017, the Trump administration announced that it would terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The DACA program had granted protection from deportation and work authorization to unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, also known as DREAMers. By mid-October 2017, multiple bills were introduced in response to this announcement including the Recognizing America's Children Act (RAC Act), the DREAM Act of 2017, the American Hope Act, the SUCCEED Act, and Border Security and Deferred Action Recipient Relief Act.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Dual Language Learners: A National Demographic and Policy Profile

Report Author: 
Maki Park, Anna O’Toole, and Caitlin Katsiaficas
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

Defined as children ages 8 and under with at least one parent who speaks a language other than English at home, dual language learners (DLLs) now make up nearly one-third of all young children in the United States. This report provides a demographic overview of the DLL population and identifies policies and practices that have proven effective in educating these children. The authors point out the vulnerabilities of these children, e.g.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Racism, the immigration enforcement regime, and the implications for racial inequality in the lives of undocumented young adults

Report Author: 
Aranda, E., & Vaquera, E.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jan

Despite the fact that living without legal documentation in the U.S. is considered a civil offense, undocumented immigrants are often depicted and treated as criminals. As a result, undocumented immigrants are subjected to policing and disciplining, such as detainment and use of ankle monitoring device, that are reserved for people who commit serious criminal offenses. Moreover, during President Barrack Obama's presidency, mass deportation reached an all-time high that only sustained the fears and anxiety of undocumented immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

The psychosocial impact of detention and deportation on U.S. migrant children and families

Report Author: 
Brabeck, K.M., Likes, M.B., & Hunter, C.
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Nov

Mixed status families - a family in which individuals have different immigration statuses but at least one member is unauthorized - are increasingly common in the U.S. Millions of U.S. citizen children have parents at risk of deportation. A parent's detention or deportation can precipitate a family crisis, particularly since detention tends to be abrupt and does not allow time for preparations. Detainees may be transferred to facilities far from their homes, limiting the ability of children to visit their parents.

Source Organization: 
Other

Comparing trauma exposure, mental health needs, and service utilization across clinical samples of refugee, immigrant, and US-Origin children

Report Author: 
Betancourt, T. S., Newnham, E. A., Birman, D., Lee, R., Ellis, B. H., & Layne, C. M
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the experiences of immigrant children differ from refugee youth, both groups experience stressors associated with acculturation, resettlement, and potential abuse or community violence. Mental health care is underutilized among refugee youth given that most services do not take into account distinct traumatic experiences and histories resulting from war-related violence.

Source Organization: 
Other

Multi-tier mental health program for refugee youth

Report Author: 
Ellis, B.H., Miller, A.B., Abdi, S., Barrett, C., Blood, E.A., & Betancourt, T.S.
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

The research literature indicates that a lack of resources has a significant impact on the overall psychosocial well-being of refugee youth, perhaps playing an even larger role in predicting psychological distress than the experience of trauma itself. Taking into account environmental factors, including resource hardships and acculturative stresses, is crucial for any intervention promoting the mental well-being of refugee youth. The authors of this study report preliminary findings from an intervention implemented with Somali refugee middle school students in New England.

Source Organization: 
Other
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