Caribbean immigrants

The Demographics of the Jobs Recovery: Employment Gains by Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Nativity

Report Author: 
Rakesh Kochhar
Original Date of Publication: 
2012 Mar

This report analyzes labor market trends in the economic recovery from 2009 to 2011. The focus is on the change in employment by race, ethnicity, gender and nativity. The report finds that, two years after the U.S. labor market hit bottom, the economic recovery has yielded slow but steady gains in employment for all groups of workers. The gains, however, have varied across demographic groups, with Hispanics and Asians, in particular, experiencing a faster rate of growth in jobs than other groups.

Source Organization: 
Pew Hispanic Center

Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-born Population in the United States, 2010

Report Author: 
Eileen Patten
Original Date of Publication: 
2012 Feb

This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau's 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) - the largest household survey in the United States with a sample of about 3 million addresses. It covers the topics previously covered in the long form of the decennial census. The ACS is designed to provide estimates of the size and characteristics of the resident population, which includes persons living in households and group quarters.

Source Organization: 
University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers, Second Edition

Report Author: 
Alan Clayton-Matthews and Paul Watanabe
Original Date of Publication: 
2012 Mar

Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers, Second Edition: Demographic Characteristics and Economic Footprint contains the most credible information to date on immigration in Massachusetts.  

Source Organization: 
The Immigrant Learning Center, Inc.

The Economic Impact of Immigrants in Minnesota

Report Author: 
Katherine Fennell, Anne Huart
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Mar

The Economic Impact of Immigrants in Minnesota (click to view)

Minnesota has a small (seven percent) but rapidly growing population of both documented and undocumented immigrants. In this report, information on the estimated fiscal costs and contributions of immigrants in Minnesota is summarized.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrants in the New York Metro Area Economy: Detail by Country of Origin

Report Author: 
Fiscal Policy Institute
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Jan

A thorough and yet easy-to-understand breakdown of metro New York's immigrant population by country of origin including their economic impact. It begains with a nationwide survey of immigrant popoulations and ecnomic impact by city.

The city-wide data sows, in order of population impact: Dominican Republic, Mexico, India, China, Jamaica, Ecuador, Colombia, Guyana and British Guiana, Philippines, Haiti, El Salvador, Korea, Trinidad and Tobago, Poland, Peru, Italy, Russia and other USSR, Ukraine, Pakistan, Cuba, Bangladesh and Hong Kong.

Source Organization: 
Fiscal Policy Institute

The Changing Profile of Long Island's Economy: How U.S.-born workers have fared as immigration has grown

Report Author: 
Fiscal Policy Institute
Original Date of Publication: 
2010 Nov

This report shows the big overall immigrant contribution to Long Island's economy not only stressing the diversity of immigrant jobs but also looking at whether immigrants are displacing U.S.-born workers or lowering wages.

Source Organization: 
Fiscal Policy Institute

Unauthorized Immigrants: Length of Residency, Patterns of Parenthood

Report Author: 
Paul Taylor, Mark Hugo Lopez, Jeffrey Passel and Seth Motel
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Dec

Nearly two-thirds of the 10.2 million unauthorized adult immigrants in the U.S. have lived in this country for at least 10 years and nearly half are parents of minor children, according to estimates from the Pew Hispanic Center.

The analysis finds that 35 percent of unauthorized adult immigrants have resided in the U.S. for 15 years or more; 28 percent for 10 to 14 years; 22 percent for 5 to 9 years; and 15percent for fewer than five years.

Source Organization: 
Pew Hispanic Center

Up for Grabs: The Gains and Prospects of First- and Second-generation Young Adults

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova and Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Nov

Youth and young adults from immigrant families today represent one in four people in the United States between the ages of 16 and 26 — up from one in five just 15 years ago. This population will assume a greater role as the US workforce ages, and how it fares in the classroom and in the workplace is of signal importance not just for these individuals but for the vibrancy of the overall US economy and local communities.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute
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