Caribbean immigrants

Stereotyped identification: How identifying with fictional Latina characters increases acceptance and stereotyping

Report Author: 
Bryan McLaughlin, Nathian S. Rodriguez, Joshua A. Dunn & Jobi Martinez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Film and media are powerful tools of influence. Although the messages can positively influence greater acceptance of certain groups, they can also intentionally or unintentionally create and uphold stereotypes of immigrants. A study by Mclaughlin, Rodriguez, Dunn, & Martinez (2018) demonstrates how television portrayals of Latina women allow viewers to cognitively and emotionally identify with the characters. This resonating identification in media increases viewers' empathy towards and acceptance of actual Latina women and immigrants on a large scale.

Source Organization: 
Other

'I'm a different kind of biracial': How black/white biracial Americans with immigrant parents negotiate race

Report Author: 
Chandra D. L. Waring and Bandana Purkayastha
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jan

Immigrants are racialized upon their migration to the United States based on country of origin, race, and ethnicity. There is an increase of biracial and multiracial people migrating and being born to immigrants in the United States. This study qualitatively analyzed the experiences of biracial Black-White children with at least one immigrant parent. The authors found participants struggled to define race, were aware of the societally produced racial hierarchy, and struggled to maintain peer groups because of their non-binary identity.

Source Organization: 
Other

Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond

Report Author: 
Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Large-scale immigration raises questions about the social and economic progress of new arrivals, their U.S.-born children and the third generation. Some observers suggest that the sheer size and geographic concentration of recent immigration could hinder immigrants' social and economic integration. The authors of this paper examine some of the available data on this question, as well as methodological problems associated with the data. The Current Population Survey (CPS) has nativity questions about the respondent and her/his parents that may be used to assess generational change.

Source Organization: 
Other

Connecting the Dots: Emerging Migration Trends and Policy Questions in North and Central America

Report Author: 
Claudia Masferrer, Víctor M. García-Guerrero, and Silvia E. Giorguli-Saucedo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

The authors of this paper take a sweeping look at the entire North American "migration corridor," consisting of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the "Northern Triangle" countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. They note that patterns of migration are much more complex and multi-directional than they were in the past, when south-north migration was the dominant pattern. For example, approximately 1 million U.S.-born persons moved to Mexico during the 2010-2015 period, made up largely of retirees and children of persons deported from the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

Source Organization: 
Other

Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

Source Organization: 
Other

Extending Temporary Protected Status for Honduras: Country Conditions and U.S. Legal Requirements

Report Author: 
Jayesh Rathod et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Following Hurricane Mitch in 1998, which displaced thousands of people and severely damaged physical infrastructure and socio-economic stability in Honduras and Nicaragua, the U.S. Congress granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Hondurans and Nicaraguans in the U.S. TPS provides relief to foreign nationals who are unable to return to their home countries due to natural disaster, economic instability or violence. This report details the current conditions in Honduras.

Source Organization: 
Other

U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

Report Author: 
Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report presents a detailed demographic analysis of the incoming U.S. refugee population from FY 2002 to FY 2017 and includes the following data points:  nationality, religious affiliation, gender, age, and state of resettlement.

Source Organization: 
Other

The impact of immigration and customs enforcement on immigrant health: Perceptions of immigrants in Everett, Massachusetts, USA

Report Author: 
Hacker, K., Chu, J., Leung, C., Marra, R., Pirie, A., Brahimi, M., Marlin, R. P.
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Aug

A series of focus groups were conducted in Everett, MA - a community with a sizeable foreign-born population - and were offered in Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Arabic, and English for immigrants of other backgrounds. Documented (37%) and undocumented (63%) participants across all the focus groups described living with a constant fear of deportation, either for themselves or their loved ones.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute
Syndicate content