Asian immigrants

Citizenship Matters: How Children of Immigrants Will Sway the Future of Politics

Report Author: 
Manuel Pastor, Justin Scoggins, Vanessa Carter & Jared Sanchez
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Jul

Citizenship Matters: How Children of Immigrants Will Sway the Future of Politics

Citizenship Matters assesses the long-term political consequences of a failure to pass comprehensive immigration reform. They argue that those who fear that a path to citizenship for the undocumented will be a path to defeat for the Republican Party are misguided in their thinking.

Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

The Changing Face of the Nation: How Hispanic and Asian Voters Could Reshape the Electorate in Key States

Report Author: 
Partnership for a New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Oct

The Changing Face of the Nation: How Hispanic and Asian Voters Could Reshape the Electorate in Key States

The authors of this study ask: who will replace the baby boomers in the American voting booth? As the older, largely white generation passes on, a major demographic shift will take place as 25.6 million Asian and Hispanic voters succeed them and in the process reshape future U.S. presidential elections.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Black and Immigrant: Exploring the Effects of Ethnicity and Foreign-Born Status on Infant Health

Report Author: 
Tiffany L. Green
Original Date of Publication: 
2012 Sep

Black and Immigrant: Exploring the Effects of Ethnicity and Foreign-Born Status on Infant Health challenges earlier research suggesting "superior" birth outcomes among immigrant mothers when compared to their native born counterparts. Most immigrant birth-outcome studies were based on data derived primarily from Mexican immigrant mothers.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Maximizing Health Care Reform for New York's Immigrants

Report Author: 
New York Immigration Coalition, Empire Justice Center and NYS Health Foundation
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

Maximizing Health Care Reform for New York's Immigrants contains a set of recommendations on how New York can maximize the inclusion of immigrants in health care reform. The authors also devote special attention to immigrants left out of federal reform. The paper is divided into five major sections: eligibility of non-citizens to participate in New York's Health Benefit Exchange; documentation and verification requirements; marketing and outreach to immigrant communities; community input and monitoring; and maintaining safety net services for the residual uninsured population.

Source Organization: 
Other

National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care

Report Author: 
Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Apr

First developed by OMH in 2000, the national CLAS Standards have been widely circulated and implemented. In 2010, OMH launched a project to update the Standards to reflect growth in the field of cultural competency and increasing diversity in the nation. The new Standards emerged out of an extensive consultation process with stakeholders and experts, many of whom recommended clarification as to the Standards' intention, terminology and implementation strategies.

Source Organization: 
Other

Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities

Report Author: 
Melanie Nezer
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

Commissioned by the J.M. Kaplan Fund, "Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities" explores the impact of resettlement on local communities and looks at the current rise of anti-refugee sentiment through case studies in three states: Tennessee, New Hampshire and Georgia.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Bride and Prejudice: How the U.S. Immigration Law Discriminates Against Spousal Visa Holders

Report Author: 
Sabrina Balgamwalla
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

This article argues that U.S. visa law, rooted in antiquated, 19thcentury notions of spousal relations, has had "devastating consequences for the day-to-day lives of H-4 spouses."  These are the spouses of H-1B visa holders, who are coveted by high tech firms for their technical skills.  Unable to legally work in the U.S., spouses are effectively confined to their homes.  They are unable to obtain a divorce, maintain custody of their children, and escape relationships of domestic violence.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other
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